Sermon – Comfort, my people

 

In this final sermon at Trinity City, Chris Jolliffe shows from Isaiah chapter 40 the extent of God’s comfort to his people, with forgiveness of sin through Jesus’ death.
Then we are shown more of God’s wonderful promises in Isaiah and reminded of God’s sovereign power and faithfulness – our God will keep every one of his promises. One of which is that our God will come (as Jesus) in power to save and bring peace and that he will also be our perfect shepherd, caring and loving.
Next Chris looks to the second part of Isaiah 40 to remind us that God knows our weaknesses, that we so easily doubt him. So we consider this series of rhetorical questions that point to God’s sovereignty and power; so that we can be fully confident that he does keep his promises, to save and ultimately to take us to be with him for ever.

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Read the Bible texts: Isaiah 40

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English Support Handout

 

Listening to the Word

I had never read anything like it! It was amazing, it was as if the words were leaping off the page and calling out to me – these words were for me!

Those chariot journeys were a good time to read and reflect. Work was so busy and so much was asked of me. My day job is Head Official overseeing the Royal Treasury. I like the responsibility and I feel honoured to be working for the Ethiopian Queen making sure my people are provided for well. Not all eunuchs are given much respect so I know I am in a fortunate position.

I can’t tell you how I came across the scroll but I have to say it blew my mind.

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Book Review: 666 and All That

666 and All That: The Truth About the Future by John Dickson and Greg Clarke (Sydney: Blue Bottle Books, 2007).

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Reviewed by Katy Annis

What happens in the End? What does the Bible say will happen in the future?

The theological term most often used to describe the end of times is ‘eschatology’. 666 and All That by John Dickson and Greg Clarke addresses the topic of eschatology, a subject that both fascinates and concerns many people.

Dickson and Clarke treat this subject with a clear, concise and ‘no-nonsense’ approach. This book has a simple underlying argument; that is, Scripture itself does not provide a literal ‘play-by-play’ description of what the future will be like, therefore, we have little to gain by attempting to understand it in this way. Rather, they suggest that our focus should be on the promises, the hope and the joy that Christians can anticipate in the future Kingdom.

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