Choosing what we sing in Church: What makes for good and effective singing? (Part 4 of 9)

By David Shead

What makes for good and effective singing?

Allow me to suggest five aspects which make for good and effective singing in church.

  1. Good and effective singing in church relies first of all on a clear awareness of what corporate worship is about and what contribution singing can make.
  2. Good and effective singing is singing that helps to bring God’s people together in honouring him, in receiving his word, in prayerfully relying on him and in strengthening each other to serve him.
  3. Good and effective singing in church is singing by the church for the church and in praise of God.
  4. Good and effective singing is not measured by its musical quality or volume or frequency or style; good and effective singing doesn’t have to mean guitar, bass, drums and three professional vocalists (nor does it have to mean organ and robed choir!). In fact (and this is a topic for another occasion), “good music” and “good corporate singing” sadly too often seem to be almost mutually exclusive. Some of the best corporate singing I have ever been part of has been unaccompanied, or very sparsely (acoustically) accompanied, and some of the worst has been in the context of a high quality, highly produced, professional musical “performance”.
  5.  Good and effective singing means the right song at the right time carried in the hearts and on the voices of the congregation to one another and to God (Ephesians 5:19)

For more in this Series:

What is corporate worship? (Part 1 of 9)

Why Sing? (Part 2 of 9)

What is the ‘shape’ of the corporate worship gathering? (Part 3 of 9)

What makes for good and effective singing? (this one)

Five principles for choosing songs (Part 5 of 9)

Choosing Songs – planning (Part 6 of 9)

Choosing Songs – preparation (Part 7 of 9)

Choosing Songs – order (Part 8 of 9)

Choosing New Songs (Part 9 of 9)

 

Choosing what we sing in Church:Why Sing? (Part 2 of 9)

By David Shead

Why sing?

What is the place of singing in corporate worship?

Of all the things we normally do when we gather together for corporate worship (singing, prayer, Bible readings, teaching, etc.), singing is not more worship or more “worshipful” than the other elements. All are equally acts of corporate worship. This is why it’s theologically misleading to refer to the song leader as the “worship leader”.

However, there is a particular and important contribution that singing makes to our corporate worship (just as there is a particular and important contribution that our corporate prayers make, or our instruction from God’s word makes, etc.). What is singing’s particular contribution? Why sing?

There are a number of important reasons:

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Sermon – Whose Slave are You? (Romans 6:1-7:6)

Romans 1-8 Slide

The gospel of free grace – justification by faith apart from works – is not a licence to sin. Our old life of sin was put to death by Jesus’ cross, and we have been given a new life of righteousness by his resurrection. That means we are no longer slaves of sin, yet slaves of God, and so we are to live out our new life, by grace not law. It is unthinkable that a Christian should continue to sin – is that possible?

Read the Bible Text – Romans 6:1-7:6

– David Shead

Choosing what we sing in Church:What is Corporate Worship? (Part 1 of 9)

By David Shead

What is corporate worship?

“Worship” is the word that sums up the whole of life.

“Worship” describes the entire orientation of your life; your attitude of humble submission and service towards the thing or person that you most value in all of existence, whether that’s yourself (or another part of the creation like money, or leisure, etc.), or the true and living God.

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Sermon – Just Justice (Romans 3:21-26)

Romans Justice evangelistic image - front.png

We all love justice and hate injustice. From earliest childhood this has been the case. One of the first complaints we learn to utter is, “That’s not fair!”

But how do we go when the finger of justice is pointing at us? Are we still as passionate about it? Or is there something else we love even more?

And what about God’s justice? How do we feel about that? Is justice beneath God? Does his justice betray a cranky side of him? And how will we go when God’s finger of justice is pointed at us?

These are very important questions!

Read the Bible Text – Romans 3:21-26

– David Shead

 

Sermon – Why, What, When of Forgiveness (John 18 – 20)

LMAP - Easter2019 - CoverPhoto

Easter is a special time for many around the world – a time to reflect, to be thankful, to lift our minds and hearts above the day to day and to appreciate the world we live in.

Arguably, more than any other event in history, Easter has shaped our world. The coming of the man Jesus and then his arrest, trial, crucifixion and then resurrection stunned the world. What Jesus taught about life, love, good works, sin, justice, forgiveness, hope has shaped cultures, governments, legislation, education, tradition and so much more. Yet his death and resurrection transformed people’s lives and gave a personal hope beyond the grave. Love him or loath him, he has left his mark for the benefit of generations across history.

In this trilogy of Easter talks, we walk with Jesus through the pages of John’s Gospel from his arrest to his resurrection.

– David Shead

Read the Bible Text – John 18:1-27

– David Shead

Read the Bible Text – John 18:28-19:42

– David Shead

Read the Bible Text – John 20:1-31

Sermon – Who says I will be judged?

LMAP - Easter2019 - CoverPhoto

We all like and want justice – yet justice is not possible unless there is judgement (vindicating the good and condemning the bad). In Jesus you have a judge – who is just, right and good. Can we say the same about our own judgements?

Read the Bible Text – John 5:16-30; John 12:44-50

Talk Outline – Who says I will be judged

– Ken Noakes

– David Shead

Sermon – God Behind it All (2 Sam 24)

2 Samuel Artwork

The closing scenes of David’s reign show the now familiar realism of saint and sinner.  He moves from despotic self-interest to a shepherd ready lay down his life for the sheep and the temple is foreseen in David’s altar.  God is revealed as unchanging in his justice and his mercy.

Read the Bible Text – 2 Samuel 24:1-25

– David Shead

Sermon – Harsh Justice & Eternal Hope (2 Samuel 21:1-14)

2 Samuel Artwork

In this sermon we hear about how King Saul’s reign left a history of offense against God. His judgement is experienced yet in the context of his mercy and faithfulness.

Read the Bible Text – 2 Samuel 21:1-14

– David Shead

– Josh Ord