Bold in Witness & the Great Commission (Part 3 of 7)

Bold in Witness

What does it mean to be bold in Witness?

Jesus asked his disciples to be his witnesses. And that is what Jesus’ first disciples did.

To be a witness, you have to be willing to make a stand, to testify, to speak on behalf of the person or the event that you are bearing witness too. The aim is to provide enough reason or evidence for someone who is not a witness to ascertain the truth behind what you say.

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Sermon – Who is Righteous? (Romans 1:16-3:20)

Romans 1-8 Slide

Who in our world is perfect? Mother Teresa? Gandhi? Nobel Peace Prize Laureates? Is there anyone in your community or family who is without fault?

In this sermon, we will see that all people are broken. Paul, the author, paints a vivid picture of how all people fall short of God’s standards. Both the religious and unreligious people of the 1st Century fell short of God’s standards.

But how do we compare? Can we reach the standards God has set? And what happens if we fail…?

Have a look at God’s perfect solution for our imperfect world.

Read the Bible Text – Romans 1:16-3:20

– Josh Ord

Sermon – The Goal of Ministry (Romans 1:5-17)

Romans 1-8 Slide

In the Old Testament we meet a brave prophet named Habakkuk (great name – imagine naming your child Habakkuk!). His role was to bring God’s people back to obedience to the covenantal promises which God has made with Israel at Mt Sinai. By the promises and under the law (10 Commandments and Covenant Code) Israel would know how to live as righteous ones. If the covenantal obligations were neglected, ignored, abandoned, then punishment would come. God’s gift had been the prophet Habakkuk, who spoke what was often thought to be an offensive message, for the sake of saving Israel and calling them to repent of their unrighteous attitudes or behaviours. In other words, to call God’s people back to the righteousness of faith.

Habakkuk admonished Israel by saying the righteous person will live by his faith’ (Hab 2:4)

Fast forward to the Apostle Paul in AD57. He writes to the church of Rome. Similarly his message was often deemed offensive. To him he understands how the promises of God in the Old Testament find their fulfilment in Jesus. So, he proclaims God’s gospel and, like Habakkuk, calls people to faith.

Quoting Habakkuk, he reminds us that ‘The righteous will live by faith’ (Rom 1:17).

In this sermon, we look at Romans 1:5-17 and we should see that faith in Jesus is the most fundamental response to God’s gospel and the way by which Christians most honour Jesus as Lord.

Read the Bible Text – Romans 1:1-17

Talk – Romans 1.5-17 (Outline)

– Ken Noakes

 

Sermon – The Essential Gospel (Romans 1:1-4)

Romans 1-8 Slide

“The most important letter ever written.”

“An open door to all the most profound treasures of Scripture.”

That – and much more – is what people have said about Paul’s letter to the Romans.

Without question, this letter has had a huge influence on our world. From Augustine in the 4th century to Luther in the 16th century to the evangelical revivals and the arrival of the gospel in Australia in the 18th century, all the major events of Christian history seem to have been ignited in some way by this magnificent letter.

In this sermon we begin with a wonderfully succinct yet profoundly deep summary of the gospel message – the core truths at the very heart of the Christian faith boiled down to just four words!

Read the Bible Text – Romans 1:1-4

Talk – Romans 1.1-4 (Outline)

– Ken Noakes

 

 

Sermon – Great Treasure

Ken Noakes’ farewell sermon at Trinity Church Adelaide considers the Great Treasure (the Gospel – the Good News about Jesus) which is given to those who follow Jesus. Ken points out from 2 Corinthians 4 the Great Responsibility that this brings as well as the Great Opportunity.

Preacher: Ken Noakes

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Read the Bible text – 2 Corinthians 4

English Support Handout – 2 Corinthians 4

Sermon – True Romance (Song of Songs#1)

In this, the first of five sermons, Des Smith explores “the strangest book in the Bible”. In what appears to be a graphic and intense love poem Des explains how human romantic love points to a bigger love story for the whole world – between God and people. Song of Songs is indeed about one man and one woman, as well as men and women, and way they love each other. But that reality – romantic love and life-long commitment that is reflected in marriage – is a picture God placed in world to point towards the ultimate reality of his love for us. A love shown in the gospel as His Son died on a cross. In this sense Song of Songs is book for everyone because it ultimately points to the love of God for everyone.

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Read the Bible text: Song of Songs 1:1 to 2:2 , Genesis 2:15-25

Sermon Script

English Support Handout